question 2

HOW DID YOU LEARN EVERYTHING?

ALEXANDRA SENES - KILOMETRE.PARIS

I meet people and read. I learn a lot from my team. I wake up at 6am and just inform myself on everything from 6am to 10am before I officially start my day.

AGATHA KULAGA - OVENLY

We read so many books and resources on business and food, but so much of us it was trial and error in the beginning. It was also essential for us to build as many relationships as possible. We reached out to other established food entrepreneurs and sought mentorship from people across many industries.  The food community in NYC is incredibly supportive and open to sharing resources. 

aMAN ADVANI - MINISTRY OF SUPPLY

The school is a great ecosystem that offers a lot of resources. We also emailed people for coffee chats and pushed relentlessly to get our answers.

Christina BRYANT - ST FRANK

I usually would start by asking someone who’s been there before and ask how they did it rather than reinventing the wheel. So I think it’s really valuable to have a network of entrepreneurs. For example, I asked the Westword Leaning founders so many questions at first because they are also developing a consumer product. They would have a more similar experience to me than my friends who started a tech company. Any entrepreneur is helpful especially when you are asking basic questions such as what lawyer they are working with. But more similar their business is to yours, the more helpful that would be.

KATIE DEMO - BRASS CLOHING

We have a lot of mentors. Old bosses at old jobs have been very helpful. We took on an executive leadership coach recently and that was great. Google, webinars, blog posts, we read all of them. I listen to a lot of podcasts as well.

LINDSEY MARTIN - BLOOM

I tried and failed and sometimes succeeded. That’s really the best way to learn and continue evolving.

LISA ANN MARKUSON - THE HAIKU GUYS + GALS

Daniel Zaltsman (Co-Founder): The feedback is so quick with what we do. Just having these conversations made us feel more confident about this strange artform and business model and think this could actually work. We are also always generating ideas. We each come to meetings with 10 ideas and have a quick brainstorming session when we’re ready to tackle something new.

OLIVER MAK - BODEGA

We talked to other professionals and listened to their advice. That’s why it’s important for us to attend trade shows and fashion shows because we meet other stores, learn what’s working for them, and they learn what’s working for us. We try to be open with other people, but obviously not tell them everything.

RITA PINTO - VANITY PROJECTS

On the job learning.

ROSE WANG - CHIRPS

We had many mentors and advisors, and we asked everyone every stupid question. To this day I still have those relationships. Many of our investors have also helped us a lot over the years.

RUTA LAUKIEN - liquid art house

The restaurant industry was completely new for me, so I talked to as many people I could such as restaurant owners, managers, and chefs. I knew I still wouldn’t know everything I could, so I made sure to surround myself with a good team. The accountant helped me a lot with finances. The accounting firm that we use works with restaurants around the country so they have the comparables. That’s very helpful to know what’s the normal margin because most restaurants are privately owned without public information.

SOPHIE ZEMBRA - ANTIDOTE

My background helped me a lot. I learned through experience. I wasn’t good at everything. I learned because I failed before.

ZACH MACKLOVITCH - SAINTWOODS

It was really hard as a struggling entrepreneur. We didn’t have the money, nobody wanted to work with us, and the brand didn’t mean anything. That was the reality.